Hello?

by Vianka McConville

If you’re looking for whistleblowers in the era of email hacking, why not list a phone number?

The New York Times has a system to receive confidential news tips which includes messaging apps, encrypted emails and snail mail, but omits a phone number.  Unless the line was bugged, I would think a phone call would be the safest way to share confidential information.

As someone who has tried to call reporters at the Times, I assume direct phone numbers are nowhere to be found due to the volume of calls the publication receives on a daily basis.  The phone system is a fortress.  But that can be a blessing and a curse; reporters may avoid the world’s worst story ideas, but also could miss out on the next big tip.

Is it an attempt to thwart a deluge of unrelated calls or have people become too comfortable behind screens and encrypted messages to actually talk to folks?

Category: Taking Aim Tags: , , , , , , , No Comments

Dangers of Cut & Paste

by Roger Pynn I always feel bad when I’m reviewing résumés and come across an applicant who self-eliminates with ... Read More »

Sticks and Stones

by Dan Ward “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” When and why did that rhyme I ... Read More »

Mistaken Identity

by Dan Ward Have we lost our ever-loving minds? When I first read that ESPN pulled a broadcaster from covering an up... Read More »

Comments are closed.